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Child Care and school requirements

Infants entering child care facilities must be up to date at the time of enrollment and are required to provide an updated certificate after completing all of the required vaccines due by 18 months of age.

  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV)
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (1 dose of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Varicella (1 dose or history of disease)
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib): age younger than 5 years only
  • Hepatitis B (HBV)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV): age younger than 5 years only
  • Hepatitis A: 1 dose, required by 18 months of age or older
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)(5 doses)
  • Hepatitis B (HBV) (3 doses)
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (2 doses of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV): fourth dose on or after the 4th birthday now required
  • Varicella (2 doses or history of disease): previously only one dose was required
  • Hepatitis A: total of 2 doses, spaced at least 6 months apart
  • Tetanus-diphtheria-pertussis booster (“Tdap”)
  • Verification of immunity to varicella: 2 doses or history of disease
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP, or DT if appropriate)
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (2 doses of each, usually given together as MMR)
  • Poliomyelitis (IPV or OPV): final dose on or after the 4th birthday now required
  • Varicella (2 doses or history of disease): previously only one dose was required
  • Hepatitis B (HBV): previously only for Kindergarten, 7th grade entry

Frequently Asked Questions

Newborn babies are immune to some disease due to their antibodies given to them at birth from their mothers, but this type of immunity may only last for a short time. And, if a child is not vaccinated, he or she may not be able to fight off disease. Before vaccines many children died from disease. These same diseases still exist today, but are at much lower incidences due to vaccines.
Vaccines in the United States are held to the highest standard and undergo years of testing in order to be licensed. Occasionally, mild side effects, such as low-grade fever or pain at the injection site, may occur. Rarely do children have moderate to severe side effects or reactions.
Immunization records are required in order to administer any vaccine. However, whenever possible, we will assist you in finding your child’s immunization record. A licensed professional will review your child’s immunization record, ask pertinent questions about your child’s medical background, and inform you of all vaccines your child will be receiving that day and their possible side effects.
You will be given Vaccine Information Statements for all the vaccines your child will receive.
Your child will receive all vaccines, administered one at a time.
You will be asked to wait 20 minutes with your child to ensure no adverse reactions will occur.
You will be given an immunization record, which should be carried with you at all times. If your child will be entering Kindergarten or is a new Tennessee resident, he or she will need to obtain a “green form” (Tennessee Immunization form) to be taken to their school. Religious exemption forms are available at the health department for parents who elect not to immunize their children for religious reasons.
The health department follows the recommendations for childhood immunizations of the Center for Disease Control and those are as follows:

CHILDREN 2 MONTHS OF AGE:
should receive DtaP (diptheria, tetanus, and acellular pertusis), IPV (polio), HBV (hepatitis B), HIB (haemophilus influenzae type b), PCV (pneumococcal), and RTA (rotavirus).

CHILDREN 4 MONTHS OF AGE:
should receive DtaP, IPV, HIB, PCV, and RTA.

CHILDREN 6 MONTHS OF AGE:
should receive DtaP, IPV, HBV, PCV, and RTA.

CHILDREN 12 MONTHS OR OLDER:
should receive DtaP, MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella), varicella (chickenpox), PCV, HAS (hepatitis A), and HIB.

CHILDREN 4 TO 6 YEARS OF AGE:
should receive DtaP, IPV, CPX, and MMR.

CHILDREN 11 TO 18 YEARS OF AGE:
should receive Tdap (tetanus, diptheria, and pertussis), HPV (human papillomavirus), and MC4 (meningococcal).

Some vaccines are now available in combination to reduce the number of actual “sticks” your child may receive; your child may be eligible for these.

Children should also receive influenza (flu) vaccine each year; if your child has not received a flu vaccination before and is less than 9 years of age, he or she will need 2 separate vaccines given 1 month apart. After the initial 2 vaccines the first year, your child will only need 1 flu vaccine every year thereafter.

Adults need a tetanus booster every 10 years, unless they become injured. It is also recommended that women receive a TDAP with each pregnancy. If an adult receives an injury and has not received tetanus vaccine within the past 5 years, he or she will need to get one as soon as possible after the injury. A flu vaccine is also recommended annually. If you are 65 years or older, a pneumococcal vaccine is recommended. Patients up to 26 years of age are encouraged to receive 3 dose series of HPV. Any adult who only received 1 dose of chickenpox vaccine, should get a second dose or complete a 2-dose series now.
Immunizations are available on a sliding scale fee based on income and in some cases children may even qualify for free vaccines.
Please refer to the international travel section of this website for information on this subject.

COMMENTS, CONCERNS,OR QUESTIONS

Please email lduncan@sullivanhealth.org with any further questions, concerns, or comments.

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